Latacunga, Capital of the Cotopaxi Province.

Latacunga also offers a quiet and congenial historic center that has partially survived several Cotopaxi eruptions. You’d never know that such a charming city lies behind the loud and polluted section that greets visitors on the Panamericana.

Volcán Cotopaxi, which dominates the town on a clear day, erupted violently in 1742 and 1768, destroying much of the city both times. The indomitable survivors rebuilt, only to have an immense eruption in 1877 wreak havoc a third time. In 2015 Latacunga was once again coated in ash from Cotopaxi; luckily, no lava flows damaged the town this time.

To celebrate their rich indigenous and Catholic history, the people of Latacunga put on one of the most famous and magnificent parties in all of Ecuador, the Mamá Negra festival which is celebrated in September and November.

Latacunga took its independence from Spain on November 11, 1820. Latacunga's most noted food is chugchucarasempanadasplantainspopcorn, and tostado (a type of toasted corn.) Often mixed with ají, a type of condiment that can be mild to very spicy depending on how it's prepared. (information from wikipedia and lonely planet).

Town Hall, it was built with pumice stone in a neoclassical style, built between 1910 and 1936.

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Main Square, with monument to Vicente León and cathedral in the background.

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Iglesia San Francisco.

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La Laguna.

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Casa de los Marqueses de Miraflores.

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Iglesia La Merced.

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Street in the centre of the city.

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Iglesia y Convento Santo Domingo.

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