Quilotoa Lagoon

Quilotoa is a water-filled caldera and the most western volcano in the Ecuadorian Andes. The 3-kilometre (2 mi)-wide caldera was formed by the collapse of this dacite volcano.

The lagoon has a greenish color as a result of dissolved minerals. Fumaroles are found on the lake floor and hot springs occur on the eastern flank of the volcano

It's a half-hour hike down from the viewpoint (and 1-2 hour hike back up the 280-meter vertical ascent), and very basic lodging down in its bowl. Camping is permitted at the bottom of the crater.

The village of Quilotoa and the associated crater is also a popular destination within the Quilotoa Loop and is a common starting point for the Quilotoa Traverse, a multi-day village to village hiking route.

(information from wikipedia)

Cañón del Río Toachi, a viewpoint close to Quilotoa

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Cañón del Río Toachi, a vewpoint close to Quilotoa.

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Hiking down to the Lagoon.

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View from the top and path down to the water.

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Start of the hike down to the lake.

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Horses are available for the challenging hike back up.

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View of the lagoon from the crater edge.

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